Who Are We?

 
We are a group of concerned individuals who met each other in many activities (college, education, outdoors, and professional activities). We come from many areas of expertise (education, computer, law, marketing, medicine, administrative and CPA), but we are united in our concern for the planet and continued human existence on it.
 

Seth Evans Seth Evans serves on the leadership team of Elders Climate Action Massachusetts. Recently retired from 19 years of teaching elementary school in Needham, MA, he remains active in the Massachusetts Teachers Association.  Seth has also organized service workers in a Boston hospital, worked as a consultant to worker-owned businesses, and founded and managed a worker-owned home health care company.  The father of two grown children, he lives in Brookline, MA. Seth has a B.A. in Biology from Antioch College, an MBA from Boston College, and an MAT from Simmons College.
 

Ted Hall is a recently retired educator who taught chemistry and environmental science in Massachusetts and Arizona for 17 years, followed by 19 years as a school administrator (17 as principal) in New Hampshire and Maine.  For the last seven years, Ted was a school coach for Great Schools Partnership where he coached schools throughout New England, Colorado, Michigan, and California.  He has both a B.S. in chemistry and an M.Ed. in science education from the University of Maine. He has been co-leading “Can We Stop Climate Change” courses since the winter of 2021.  As a science teacher, he brought environmental topics alive in his classroom and has maintained an interest in climate science since that time. He lives in southern Maine where he spends lots of time kayaking, cycling, hiking, and cross country skiing.
 

Margie Lee’s background is in government and public policy. Now retired, she previously worked in higher education administration, and as a volunteer educator for grassroots initiatives like Energyfast, Beyond War, and Foundation for Global Community. She has supported local environmental programs like town Earth Day celebrations, banning single use plastics, and educational programs. She loves being in the out-of-doors, whether gardening, walking, cycling or other sports. She has a keen appreciation of nature and seeks to preserve a healthy world for her three grandsons and future generations. She has a B.A. in Government from Skidmore College, and a Graduate Certificate from the Boston College program on Women in Politics and Public Policy.
 

Tony Lee lives in the Boston area and is a retired CPA and former US Navy officer. He began working on environmental and non-profit causes in 1980 with Friends of the Earth, and has continued to do so throughout his life, particularly around climate change. He has developed and led the Can We Stop Climate Change course in conjunction with Elders Climate Action. When Tony isn’t teaching about climate change he enjoys mountain biking and gardening. He has a B.A. in Economics from Yale University and an MBA from Rutgers.
 

John More is a retired international banking and environmental lawyer living in Washington DC and spending summers in Maine. In the 1970s he was a co-founder of the RI Chapter of the Sierra Club, and he later worked as an environmental lawyer opposing LNG pipelines and suing toxic waste disposal sites. More recently he has been active as an inner-city community organizer for affordable housing and environmental justice issues, particularly in coordination with the Sierra Club DC Chapter’s campaign to ban methane gas for heating and cooking as part of meeting DC’s zero-carbon climate goals. John also enjoys sailing, hiking, and refereeing soccer. He has a B.A. from Yale, and a Ph.D. and J.D. from Harvard.
 

Tom Rawson is a recently retired 7th- and 8th-grade science teacher who lives near Boston. He attended and then started leading Can We Stop Climate Change courses, works on climate change education with Mass. Audubon, and is an En-ROADS Climate Ambassador. His environmental interest began with work on campus for the first Earth Day in 1970; his interest in climate change grew beginning about 12 years ago when he started teaching it to 8th-graders. Before becoming a teacher Tom ran his own software business for many years. He spends his free time doing carpentry, bicycle riding, hiking, and sailing when he can. He has a B.A. in Biology from Swarthmore College, an M.S. in Biomathematics from the University of Washington, and an M.Ed. from UMass Boston.
 

Steve Storch spent a long career working for organizations performing science and technology R&D in communications and computer networking. Since retirement he has worked with small teams providing pro bono management consulting for nonprofit organizations. Recognizing the existential challenge posed by global warming, and wanting to contribute to efforts addressing the challenge, he attended a Can We Stop Climate Change webinar, then joined the team as a facilitator. Steve has a BS in Physics with additional focus in Philosophy, and completed the Greater Boston Executive Program in Business Management at MIT’s Sloan School. He lives in the Boston area, and spends his time traveling (especially enjoyable with his adult children and their partners), engaging with friends and family, continued consulting, and biking.
 

As a teenager Debra Taylor’s father handed her a new report, “The Limits to Growth”. It helped her understand systems thinking about limited planetary resources like fossil fuels. Now almost 50 years later, Debra sees the Can We Stop Climate Change? modules as providing frameworks to understand climate change, and the opportunity to learn with community support how to act on mitigation. With our effort, Debra envisions an acceleration of positive action and hopeful energy that will alter the course of climate change.
 

Bill Woodfin is a retired neurologist and fifth generation Texan whose family has long been in the cattle ranching and oil and gas businesses. Over the past 40 plus years he and his wife have tended what was once a horse farm and has evolved into more of a wildlife sanctuary. They have a particular dedication to native plant and grassland restoration and providing habitat for fauna and flora in one of the most rapidly growing counties in Texas. He began to educate himself on climate change 12-13 years ago when he became curious about the relation of global warming to the expanding range of disease vectors including mosquitoes and ticks. His interest and concern became all the greater with the subsequent birth of his four grandchildren. He has been active locally in the Native Plant Society of Texas, Audubon, and with The Heard Museum of Natural History and Wildlife Sanctuary. He obtained his B.A. from Yale College and his M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine. He served in the Army Medical Corps in the early 1970s.